10 mobility plan corridors LA should do now

Listen to the City Council talking about how dangerous LA’s streets are.

If city leaders are serious about changing course, they don’t have to wait until either Healthy Streets LA becomes law in 2024 or the Council President’s version passes — they could do so now, voluntarily, and show citizens how the status quo is no longer acceptable.

National either has no bike infrastructure or a door zone bike lane; the mobility plan promises protected lanes.
Melrose has zero bike infrastructure. This is where Uplift Melrose was supposed to go.
Venice Bl’s door zone bike lane — not the protected bike lanes promised. Also absent: the bus lane.
7th St’s bike lane — this is in the door zone not the protected bike lanes promised.
Central Ave’s bike lane — this is in the door zone not the protected bike lanes promised.
Arlington Ave — lacking any bike infrastructure whatsoever. Supposed to have Class 2 bike lanes.
San Vicente’s door zone bike lane — not the protected bike lanes promised.
Sherman Way — it either has door zone bike lanes or no bike lanes, nothing the mobility plan promised.
Woodley has unprotected door zone bike lanes, when it should have protected bike lanes.
Hollywood Bl has zero bike infrastructure, a far cry from the protected bike lane on the mobility plan.

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Michael Schneider

Michael Schneider

346 Followers

Tali, Mika & Sofi’s dad, Katerina's husband, LA native. Founder, Service. Founder, Streets For All. Board Member, Mid City West Neighborhood Council.