In many cities throughout North America — and especially in Los Angeles — there’s a street fight over shared public space. Up until 100 years ago, streets served everyone — people walking, people on bikes, people on horses, people taking public transit. Basically, streets existed for the greatest good — to serve as many people as possible. Then, with the introduction of mass market, more affordable cars, everything changed. All of a sudden, we started redesigning our cities to serve not people, but cars. This graphic does a great job of explaining the progression:

Photo credit: TUM Initiative

Today, there is a renaissance of…


Back in 2019, the Mid City West Neighborhood Council (whose board I currently sit on as Vice Chair) passed a motion asking for more bike/scooter corrals in Mid City West. The idea was simple — make it more convenient to park your bike, and maybe more people will use bikes to get around. I approached Paul Koretz, the current sitting Councilmember for Council District 5 (and killer of Uplift Melrose) with the idea, and was told by his office to pick one location to start.

I picked a location in front of “Toasted and Roasted” on Melrose — a local…


Growing up in LA, you learn from an early age that a car is the only way to get around town. You equate cars with “freedom,” and it’s this thought that I had in my head at the DMV at 8am on my 16th birthday. I. Couldn’t. Wait.

As I made more money as an adult, I spent a disproportionate amount of it on expensive car leases, even going so far as to do European Delivery on BMW’s that I custom designed — twice.

Nine years ago, for a variety of reasons, I did a complete 180° and gave up…


A (dated — missing North Westwood) map of LA’s Neighborhood Council system

When LA’s Neighborhood Council system was formed in 1999, it was part of a larger charter reform effort to prevent the San Fernando Valley from seceding from the City. Each neighborhood council was given $50,000/year from the city and became the “closest form of government to the people,” advising city council members on what specific neighborhoods in Los Angeles wanted and needed.

In the Great Recession of 2008, the Los Angeles City Council cut neighborhood council budgets by 20%, to $40,000 a year. …


1950s / 3rd St in Santa Monica. Photo credit: Martin Turnbull

In the 1950s, 3rd St in Santa Monica looked like every other street in the city; it had two lanes of vehicle traffic in each direction, and parking on both sides of the street. In other words, it looked like nearly every major street in Los Angeles.

In the 1965, the city decided to close the street to cars, and open it to people. The new “outdoor mall” was opened in November, 1965. This was not without controversy; people who fought the change, said the following:

  • If you do this, you will kill the businesses on the street.
  • Where will…

If you follow me online, you know I’m very passionate about fixing how we get around cities. There are a few reasons:

1 — I want to survive to see my daughters get married, and I resent that I have to risk my life to get around Los Angeles choosing to use a bicycle.

2 — I believe climate change is real, and 60% of our greenhouse gas emmissions come from cities. In the US, the largest source of our greenhouse gas emissions (28%) is the Transportation sector, and cars make up 59% of Transportation.

If you solve how people…


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2020 was one of the craziest years we’ve seen in our lifetimes — from a once-in-100-years pandemic to our democracy being threatened by a sitting President, it was truly unprecedented. However, one thing that didn’t change is the persistent loud minority that opposes safer streets and positive change in our community. …


About a month and a half ago, I got a phone call from one of my colleagues on the Mid City West Community Council (one of LA’s 99 “neighborhood councils”). He was excited that StreetsLA (our Bureau of Street Services) was considering applying for a $40M grant to redo a long section of Melrose (between Fairfax and Highland)— one of LA’s most iconic streets. The street is also on the city’s “High Injury Network” and part of the City’s 2035 Mobility Plan where it has a planned protected bike lane. Here is what “Uplift Melrose” was proposed to look like:

New trees, new lighting, wider sidewalks, and LA’s first curb-level protected bike lane

Source: Shutterstock

In the 1970’s, CFOs sat with CEOs and devised ways for upset consumers to not be able to get compensation easily. They put up automated phone systems, arcane and inflexible policies, and rejoiced at how little the company had to “give up” to complaining customers. And this system worked… until social media gave every average “Joe” the same power as society’s most prominent citizens to get a company’s attention when they weren’t happy.

Watching today’s f8, one couldn’t help but wonder if the future is truly opening a chat and text’ing what you need. …


Here is a list of major cities — arguably just as “under threat” as London — where I’ve never had a security issue at an airport: New York, Paris, Tel Aviv, Berlin, Munich, Tokyo, Beijing, Shanghai, Sydney, Chicago, Mexico City, and my home town of Los Angeles.

Here’s a list of cities I’ve had persistent security issues: London.

On Saturday, January 16 I arrived at Heathrow Terminal 5. I went through the “fast track” for my flight to Munich. At the metal detector I went through and nothing alarmed. As I patiently waited for my bag at the other end…

Michael Schneider

Tali, Mika & Sofi’s dad, Katerina's husband, LA native. Founder, Service. Founder, Streets For All. Board Member, Mid City West Community Council.

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